Laparoscopy

Laparoscopy has transformed the way surgery is being performed around the world. Today, this minimally invasive technique has many applications and is commonly used in urology and gynaecology. Coloplast offers a number of innovative products developed specifically for minimally invasive surgery.

Our unique Elefant suction/irrigation device, was purposefully designed with comfort, performance and safety in mind.

 

Learn about morbidity related to your conventional suction-irrigation device… and why you should have an Elefant in the room! Visit the Elefant website, and learn about why experts like Pr. Morgan Roupret and Pr. Bernardo Rocco have chosen to have an Elefant in their OR.

What are the main complications linked to
suction-irrigation devices?

Electrothermal Injuries

Electrothermal Injuries

When energy is conducted to non-targeted tissue. Read more

As the number of laparoscopic procedures continues to rise, electrothermal injuries could represent an important source of preventable harm and even death. Elefant was purposefully designed to address this complication. It is made of non-conductive E-Fiber glass, unlike conventional cannulas that are made of metal/stainless steel.

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Mechanical Injuries

Mechanical Injuries

When a cannula causes trauma to tissues. Read more

Mechanical injuries should remind surgeons of the need to choose flexible & non-traumatic suction-irrigation cannulas. Elefant was purposefully designed to prevent trauma. The cannula of Elefant is non-traumatic, with a yankauer-type tip that prevent suction of neighbouring tissues.

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Cross Contamination

Cross Contamination

How clean is clean enough? Read more

Choosing a single use device rather than a reusable one brings several advantages to patients as well as healthcare professionals. Elefant was purposefully designed to address this complication. Elefant is a single use product eliminating the risk of cross-contamination as well as any sterilisation costs.

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Expert Opinions: Why they choose to have an Elefant in their operating room?

Watch Elefant in action

Prostatectomy Procedure

Prostatectomy Procedure

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Prostatectomy Procedure

What is the role of the Elefant in procedure?

"Elefant is used for suction and for dissection of node template and fascia
of the prostate. It’s also crucial for exposing the bladder neck during the
procedure and the dissection of the posterior plan with the extirpation of
the seminal vesicles.”

 

Key advantages of using Elefant?
"The cannula of Elefant is non-traumatic and non-conductive, meaning the dissection is clean and it reduces surgical morbidity."

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Partial Nephrectomy

Partial Nephrectomy

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Partial Nephrectomy

What is the role of the Elefant in procedure?

"Elefant is used for suction, to delineate the exophytic tumor,
to expose the tumor bed and to dissect the peri-tumor (toxic) fat.”

 

Key advantages of using Elefant?
"The cannula of Elefant is non-traumatic and non-conductive, meaning the dissection is clean and reduces surgical morbidity. It also improves the vision during stitching and suture, since the non-traumatic tip decreases bleeding."

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Neobladder

Neobladder

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Neobladder

What is the role of the Elefant in procedure?

"Elefant is used for suction, dissection of the nodes
template and to expose the digestive tube.”

 

Key advantages of using Elefant?
"The cannula of Elefant is non-traumatic and non-conductive, giving it an advantage when constructing and suturing the neobladder and to reduce overall surgical morbidity."

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Reference list

See full list of references

Electrothermal injuries References:


1. GUZMAN, C. (2018). Estimating the Incidence of Stray Energy Burns during Laparoscopic Surgery based on Two Statewide Databases and Retrospective Rates: An Opportunity to Improve Patient Safety. Surgical technology international, 34.
2. Tucker, R. D. (1995). Laparoscopic electrosurgical injuries: survey results and their implications. Surgical laparoscopy & endoscopy, 5(4), 311-317.
3. Overbey, D. M., et al. (2015). Surgical energy-based device injuries and fatalities reported to the food and drug administration. Journal of the American College of Surgeons, 221(1), 197-205.
4. Odell, R. C. (2013). Surgical complications specific to monopolar electrosurgical energy: engineering changes that have made electrosurgery safer. Journal of minimally invasive gynecology, 20(3), 288-298.

 

Mechanical injuries References:


1. Shen, C. C., et al. (2002). Characteristics and management of large bowel injury in laparoscopic-assisted vaginal hysterectomy. The Journal of the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists, 9(1), 35-39.
2. Wang, C. W., et al. (1995). Bowel injury by the suction-irrigator during operative laparoscopy. The Journal of the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists, 2(3), 353-354.
3. Cassaro, S. (2015). Delayed manifestations of laparoscopic bowel injury. The American Surgeon, 81(5), 478-482.
4. Xin, H., et al. (2006, March). Laparoscopic surgery, perceptual limitations and force: A review. In First Canadian student conference on biomedical computing (Vol. 144)

 

Cross-contamination References:


1. Cowen, A. E. (2001). The clinical risks of infection associated with endoscopy. Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 15(5), 321-331.
2. Alfa, M. J., & Nemes, R. (2004). Manual versus automated methods for cleaning reusable accessory devices used for minimally invasive surgical procedures. Journal of Hospital Infection, 58(1), 50-58.
3. Montero, P. N., et al. (2010). Insulation failure in laparoscopic instruments. Surgical endoscopy, 24(2), 462-465.

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